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NATIVE MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPANTS

NATIVE AMERICANS MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPANTS

American Indian Medal of Honor Recipants

In the 20th century, five American Indians have been among those soldiers to be distinguished by receiving the United States' highest military honor: the Medal of Honor. Given for military heroism "above and beyond the call of duty," these warriors exhibited extraordinary bravery in the face of the enemy and, in two cases, made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

Jack C. Montgomery. A Cherokee from Oklahoma, and a First Lieutenant with the 45th Infantry Division Thunderbirds. On 22 February 1944, near Padiglione, Italy, Montgomery's rifle platoon was under fire by three echelons of enemy forces, when he single-handedly attacked all three positions, taking prisoners in the process. As a result of his courage, Montgomery's actions demoralized the enemy and inspired his men to defeat the Axis troops.

Ernest Childers. A Creek from Oklahoma, and a First Lieutenant with the 45th Infantry Division. Childers received the Medal of Honor for heroic action in 1943 when, up against machine gun fire, he and eight men charged the enemy. Although suffering a broken foot in the assault, Childers ordered covering fire and advanced up the hill, single-handedly killing two snipers, silencing two machine gun nests, and capturing an enemy mortar observer.

Van Barfoot. A Choctaw from Mississippi, and a Second Lieutenant in the Thunderbirds. On 23 May 1944, during the breakout from Anzio to Rome, Barfoot knocked out two machine gun nests and captured 17 German soldiers. Later that same day, he repelled a German tank assault, destroyed a Nazi fieldpiece and while returning to camp carried two wounded commanders to safety.

Mitchell Red Cloud Jr. A Winnebago from Wisconsin, and a Corporal in Company E., 19th Infantry Regiment in Korea. On 5 November 1950, Red Cloud was on a ridge guarding his company command post when he was surprised by Chinese communist forces. He sounded the alarm and stayed in his position firing his automatic rifle and point-blank to check the assault. This gave his company time to consolidate their defenses. After being severely wounded by enemy fire, he refused assistance and continued firing upon the enemy until he was fatally wounded. His heroic action prevented the enemy from overrunning his company's position and gained time for evacuation of the wounded.

Charles George. A Cherokee from North Carolina, and Private First Class in Korea when he was killed on 30 November 1952. During battle, George threw himself upon a grenade and smothered it with his body. In doing so, he sacrificed his own life but saved the lives of his comrades. For this brave and selfless act, George was posthumously award the Medal of Honor in 1954.

Our Success is only as Good as our Team of Volunteers

We are a grassroots volunteer charity. we strive for 100% of all donations to reach those in need. Our Board, Staff and Volunteers have agreed to accept no salaries for our work with this corporation. Our efforts are to ensure the continual movement of donations and supplies to our fellow Native Americans who are truly in need. Our motive is the sincere desire to serve from the heart, as our ancestors did.

Some of these dedicated volunteers have decades of experience in humanitarian programs, working unselfishly while receiving payments of warm smiles, thank you hugs and heart felt love.

There is no greater satisfaction of the heart then to see the smile on a child’s face when handing them a toy or an elder’s smile upon receiving a warm blanket. There is no greater joy then to serve those who can not serve themselves.

                               

Disclaimer:

 

AIHF charges “NO” fees for any services provided. AIHF does not assume responsibility for errors, and all information provided via this Web site is intended for informational purposes only and is subject to change or withdrawal by AIHF at any time without notice. Links from these pages to external Web sites are provided as a service to visitors and do not constitute an endorsement by AIHF. Certain programs, services, projects and links listed here are not operated by nor are they the responsibility of AIHF. Some information published herein is gathered from sources which are thought to be reliable, but the reader should not assume that the information is official or final.

American Indian Humanitarian Foundation
A National 501(c)(3) Non-profit Corporation 


Mailing Address
97 S. Main #327 
Brigham City, Utah 84302
AIHF@4AIHF.org 
(435-757-3399)
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Texas Branch Office
"For Faster Mail Response Time"
P.O. Box 419
Waxahachie, TX 75168
(214-463-5061)
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Other Numbers
 
Washington, D.C.
202-386-6044
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Toll Free
888-295-7906

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